Ideology in the Classroom 

Four quotations appear below. One is a "parent" quotation -- a passage taken word-for-word from an actual essay entitled "impassioned teaching," published in an online journal. Three are "substitution" examples -- quotations using the same phrasing, but inserting another term for the one used in the original version.

The object: see if you can tell which of the following is the original quotation.

Marxism-Leninism is a mode of analysis, a set of values, and a political movement. In teaching students its history, its forms, and its impact, I am teaching them to think and write as Marxist-Leninists. I want to convince my students of the value of Marxist-Leninist analysis and the importance of Marxist-Leninist praxis. . . . I feel I am doing my job well when students become practitioners of Marxist-Leninist analysis and committed to Marxist-Leninist politics.

Marxism in the Classroom, April 1935 

National Socialism is a mode of analysis, a set of values, and a political movement. In teaching students its history, its forms, and its impact, I am teaching them to think and write as National Socialists. I want to convince my students of the value of National Socialist analysis and the importance of National Socialist praxis. . . . I feel I am doing my job well when students become practitioners of National Socialist analysis and committed to National Socialist politics.

Kämpfende Lehrberuf, October 1933 

Feminism is a mode of analysis, a set of values, and a political movement. In teaching students its history, its forms, and its impact, I am teaching them to think and write as feminists. I want to convince my students of the value of feminist analysis and the importance of feminist praxis. . . . I feel I am doing my job well when students become practitioners of feminist analysis and committed to feminist politics.

Academic Forum, Autust 2007 

Christianity is a mode of analysis, a set of values, and a religious movement. In teaching students its history, its forms, and its impact, I am teaching them to think and write as Christians. I want to convince my students of the truth of Christian thinking, and the importance of Christian living. . . . I feel I am doing my job well when students become active Christians committed to Christian evangelism.

Christian Teaching Today, May 2004